Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Aur yeh bhe hain...

Expressing solidarity: Jamaat-e-Islami rally slams Morsi’s ouster 

KARACHI: Activists of Jamaat-e-Islami (JI) staged a rally on Sunday against the military coup in Egypt that resulted in the ouster of Mohamed Morsi, the country’s first ever elected president.

Carrying posters of Morsi, the participants burnt effigies of General Abdel Fattah el Sisi, the supreme commander of the Egyptian armed forces, and Adly Mansour, the acting president.

Addressing the rally, JI chief Syed Munawar Hasan declared that overthrow of a democratically elected leader by the military was unacceptable and demanded Morsi’s release from house arrest.

The best option for the civilised world is to adhere to their much trumpeted core principles,” he said. “This was a military coup and must be recognised as such no matter what the reason was or else Muslims across the world should not be blamed for seeking alternatives, even violent ones, for democracy.”
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My comment: Isn't it rather naive to expect the "civilised" world (which has proven itself to be awesomely civilized in the past) to stick to its principles (the princples it has proven to stick to awsomely in the past!)

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Tunisian rulers bemoan Egypt's 'coup against legitimacy'

(Reuters) - Tunisia, birthplace of the Arab Spring pro-democracy uprisings, on Thursday criticized the Egyptian army's removal of elected president Mohamed Mursi as "a coup against legitimacy" and urged Cairo to guarantee his safety.
Mursi rose to power after autocratic president Hosni Mubarak was toppled in a 2011 uprising inspired by the popular revolt against dictatorship in Tunisia a few weeks before. Moderate Islamists were subsequently elected to govern Tunisia.

"Military intervention is totally unacceptable and we call on Egypt to ensure that Mursi is physically protected," said President Moncef Marzouki. "We view what is happening in Egypt with concern - the arrests of journalists and politicians.".
Tunisia's ruling Ennahda party denounced also what it called a "coup against legitimacy" in Egypt. "Ennahda rejects what happened and believes legitimacy is represented by President Mursi and no one else," Ennahda said in a statement.
It said it feared that "this coup will fuel violence and extremism" and induce despair in the value of democracy.
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Erdogan condemns Egypt Army over Morsi ouster

 
Turkey has condemned the removal of Egypt's ousted president, Mohamed Morsi, from office through a military intervention, criticizing the West for failing to call the ouster a coup.


"No matter where they are ... coups are bad.... Coups are clearly enemies of democracy," Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said in a televised speech on Friday, adding, "Those who rely on the guns in their hands, those who rely on the power of the media cannot build democracy.... Democracy can only be built at ballot box," he added.

Erdogan, who had established friendly ties with Morsi, welcomed the African Union's decision to suspend Egypt over the army's intervention, and criticized the West’s double standards.

"The West has failed the sincerity test.... No offense, but democracy does not accept double standards," he said.
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Turkey condemns Cairo shooting, calls it 'massacre'

ANKARA (Reuters) - Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu condemned the Cairo shooting in which at least 42 people died on Monday, describing the incident as a "massacre" and calling for the start of a normalisation process.
Islamist protesters angered by president Mohamed Mursi's overthrow said the killings occurred when they were fired on outside Republican Guard headquarters. The military blamed the bloodshed on a "terrorist group" that tried to storm the compound and said at least one soldier was killed and 40 hurt.
"I strongly condemn the massacre that took place in Egypt at morning prayer in the name of the fundamental human values which we have been advocating," Davutoglu said on Twitter.
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My comment: At least these guys (all above) had the guts to speak out the truth. Even though, they know they're not going to increase their popularity in the Western world through these remarks. But at least they have respect for truth and integrity - rather than throwing every value away in the name of consolidating power. 



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