Saturday, January 28, 2012

The Way to ♥ Venerate RasoolAllah (sallAllahu alyhi wasallam) ♥

Venerate: {meaning: to admire, adore, apotheosize, appreciate, be in awe of, cherish, esteem, exalt, hallow, hold in awe, honor, idolize, look up to, love, put on a pedestal, regard, respect, think highly of, treasure, value him} •► is to OBEY him, do as he commanded and avoid that which he forbade, and to love him; he is not to be venerated through innovations, myths and sins. Celebrating his birthday is of this blameworthy type because it is a SIN. The people who venerated the Prophet (sallAllahu alyhi wasallam) the most were the Sahaabah (may Allaah be pleased with them), as ‘Urwah ibn Mas’ood (radi Allahu 'anhu) said to the Quraysh:

♥ “O people, by Allaah I have visited kings. I went to Caesar, Chosroes and the Negus, but by Allaah I never saw a king whose companions venerated him as much as the companions of Muhammad venerated Muhammad (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). By Allaah, whenever he spat it never fell on the ground, it fell into into the hand of one his companions, then they wiped their faces and skins with it. If he instructed them to do something, they would hasten to do as he commanded. When he did wudoo’, they would almost fight over his water. When he spoke they would lower their voices in his presence; and they did not stare at him out of respect for him.” ♥

(al-Bukhaari, 3/178, no. 2731, 2732; al-Fath, 5/388).

Yet despite this level of veneration, they never took the day of his birth as an ‘Eid (festival). If that had been prescribed in Islam they would not have neglected to do that.


THINK ABOUT IT! WHO ARE YOU FOLLOWING?
 

19 comments:

XV said...

Asalamualykum wa rahmatullahi

I had read your post on Mawlid last year and didn’t comment because it’s a contentious issue. From my intermittent reading of your blog since then, I have the impression that you are not averse to having a civil discussion masha'Allah.

It’s agreed that some people do weird stuff on Mawlid celebrations. And some scholars prohibited mawlid on those grounds and there are other scholars who deemed it prohibited to celebrate Mawlid regardless of the situation.

However, on the other hand, giants of the ummah held it to be permissible. As-Suyuti, Ibn Hajr, and izzi din abdus salam to name a few. And apparently there are some opinions of even Ibn Taymiyyah, ibn al Jawzi and ibn Khateer that lean towards permissibility. So there is a legitimate difference of opinion amongst the scholars on the issue.

Uni said...

@XV
Everybody is free to follow any logic by any scholar of course. The simplest thing (for a person like me) is that Prophet Muhammad and His Companions didn't celebrate anything except the two Eids. This was their only celebration.

To add one more event as part of the deen, seems to be an innovating act.

Allah Knows Best.

PS: Leaning towards permissibility may mean that just remembering nabi (SAW) on that day, talking about the Sunnah etc. is all right. So yes, in that case, it's all right.

The celebration I'm talking about is actual event kind of thing, with lights and all, milaads and stuff. Milaads can be held on other dates too, no?

XV said...

Asalamualaykum wa rahmatullahi,

Valid points that the eids are 2 and there’s no argument about that. But just because someone commemorates/celebrates the day of the birth of the prophet (saw) does not mean that they are making it a part of deen or going against the hadith of the Nabi (saw) and making it a 3rd eid.

In a very well known hadith, it is mentioned that Abu Lahb’s punishment is lightened because he rejoiced when the prophet (saw) was born and freed the slave girl who brought him the news of the birth of the prophet. This is the same Abu Lahb who later went on to become one of the greatest enemies of the prophet (saw). The same Abu Lahb regarding whom it is said in the Quran: “Perish the hands of the father of the flame…” If such a staunch enemy of the prophet (saw) who brought so much harm to the prophet (saw) is given respite for rejoicing at the birth of the prophet, then are we going to tell a believer that he is sinful for rejoicing at his (saw) noble birth, whether it’s 8th or 12th or any other date? And whether it’s once a year or once a month?

And I’ve never heard anyone say that they love the prophet (saw) more than the sahaba (ra). This is an argument that I’m not quite able to follow. Who in their right mind says or even implies that they venerate the prophet (saw) more than the sahaba just because they do a mawlid and the sahaba didn’t? Have you ever heard anybody say that? Abu Lahab freed a slave girl at the birth of the prophet (saw) and his punishment is lightened. According to the above logic, are we going to say that Abu Lahab loved the prophet more than the sahaba b/c he performed that action and the sahaba didn’t?

XV said...

I've read my post and the tone may seem to be harsh and I apologize if it comes off as that but it's not meant to be. Please don't take it as that. :)

Uni said...

@XV
Milaads, sadly, have become part of Islam. People arrange milaads especially in Rabiul Awwal to get sawaab. They think it's a religious act, whereas it has got no basis (the event I mean) in Sunnah.

By third Eid, I only meant calling it 'Eid-e-milaad-un-Nabi' and 'celebrating' it. There are various indicators - lights, decorations and probably even new clothes.

About Abu Lahb, who rejoiced at the birth of Muhammad (saw). I'm wondering as to how a comparison can be drawn between a very clearly one-time historic (and very human) reaction - and - taking that action as part of our lives, and continuing to do so.

Abu Lahb's reaction was a human one. He rejoiced, yes. But did he believe? No. His punishment got lightened, yes. But did he escape punishment? No. How can we follow Abu Lahb's act - and take it up as part of our lives, and do it every year? It doesn't make any sense. Furthermore, did you see him do that every year at 12th (or any other date) Rabiul Awwal... and find the Prophet (saw) liking/approving this act?

No, because birthdays were just not celebrated in Sunnah. You're equating two very different things. If you're given news of a close relatives' son - and you feel happy about that, that's VERY different from you making it a point to especially celebrate that particular day, for the rest of your life.

How can the two things be equated?

I didn't get the argument about the sahaba..? What exactly do you mean by that? Could you please rephrase it? Sorry.

And Allah Knows Best.

Jazakallah for your thoughts. No, no apologies needed.

XV said...

Asalamualaykum wa rahmatullah,
My answers are in bold


>>Milaads, sadly, have become part of Islam. People arrange milaads especially in Rabiul Awwal to get sawaab. They think it's a religious act, whereas it has got no basis (the event I mean) in Sunnah.

I don’t get what’s wrong with people hoping to get rewarded? Every deed done properly is worthy of reward. If I’m not mistaken, I think Ibn Abbas (ra) said he hoped to get rewarded for even sleeping.
Of course those who think that milads are mandatory on 12 rabbi ul awwal should be educated.


>>About Abu Lahb, who rejoiced at the birth of Muhammad (saw). I'm wondering as to how a comparison can be drawn between a very clearly one-time historic (and very human) reaction - and - taking that action as part of our lives, and continuing to do so.

>>Abu Lahb's reaction was a human one. He rejoiced, yes. But did he believe? No. His punishment got lightened, yes. But did he escape punishment? No.

But does the lightning of punishment indicate that his rejoicing at the birth was a good thing? Yes. So can we say muslims rejoicing at his (saw) birth are being sinful??

>>How can we follow Abu Lahb's act - and take it up as part of our lives, and do it every year? It doesn't make any sense. Furthermore, did you see him do that every year at 12th (or any other date) Rabiul Awwal... and find the Prophet (saw) liking/approving this act?

So are you saying that if something good is done once, it’s good and will be rewarded (like abu lahab’s rejoicing). But if it’s done every year, then it’s sinful? (like muslims rejoicing)?
If you say that only good deeds that can be done every year are what the nabi (saw) explicitly approved of being done every year, then taraweeh wouldn’t be permissible. According to your logic, Did nabi (saw) pray taraweeh in ramadan every year in congregation? No. Did he do it for the whole month? No. He did it once in Ramadan and even that only for a couple of days. And then he stopped. If Nabi (saw) did not do it, then why do we do it? And, not only that, Nabi (saw) did it for a couple of days, but we do it for the whole month.


>>No, because birthdays were just not celebrated in Sunnah. You're equating two very different things. If you're given news of a close relatives' son - and you feel happy about that, that's VERY different from you making it a point to especially celebrate that particular day, for the rest of your life.

Nabi (saw) DID make it a point to celebrate that particular day for the rest of his life. Not just once a year, but every week:
Abu Qatadah (May Allah be pleased with him) reported: The Messenger of Allah (PBUH) was asked about fasting on Mondays. He said, "That is the day on which I was born and the day on which I received Revelation.''
[Muslim].

Even the Sahabas (ra) acted upon this. And so did the scholars.

And as for something happening once and being commemorated yearly again and again, we have example of Ashura.
Hazrat Ibn Abbas (Radiyallahu 'anh) reports that the Holy Prophet (Sallallahu ‘alayhi wa Sallam) arrived in Madinah and found the Jews observing fast on the day of ‘Ashura… They said: "It is the day of great (significance) when Allah delivered Hazrat Musa ('Alaihis-Salaam) and his people and drowned Pharoah and his people, and Sayyidina Musa ('Alaihis-Salaam) observed fast out of gratitude. And we also observe it." The Holy Messenger of Allah (Sallallahu ‘alayhi wa Sallam) responded: "We have more right, and we have closer connection with Sayyidina Musa ('Alaihis-Salaam) than you have"; so Allah’s Messenger (Sallallahu ‘alayhi wa Sallam) observed fast (on the day of ‘Ashura) and gave us orders to observe it. [Sahih Bukhari and Muslim]

Uni said...

@XV

Sorry for late comment replies. I am kind of swamped these days.

First of all, the hadith on fasting on Mondays:

Narrated Usamah ibn Zayd said that the •► Messenger of Allah (sallAllaahu 'alayhi wasallam ) used to fast on Monday and Thursday. When he was asked about it, he (sallAllahu 'alyhi wasallam ) said: "The works of the servants (of Allah) are presented (to Allah) on Monday and Thursday." [Abu Dawud :: Book 13 : Hadith 2430]

So the hadith you quoted, that hadith is a Muslim hadith (could you find an exact source for it please?) - it's pointing towards Monday for multiple reasons, not just one. And the hadith I quoted, adds another reason.

So using these ahadith to give importance to birthday of the Holy Prophet (saw) and thinking that celebrating it as a special day is something deen-y, is not plausible.

About you not understanding how deeds done purely for sawaab can be wrong, when even sleeping can be rewarded. So the answer is, that sleeping, eating, or any other act such as fasting, keeping a beard, etc.. all these acts are proven from Sunnah.

Celebrating 12th Rabbiul Awwal as a special day isn't.

So doing something that isn't proven from sunnah as part of deen doesn't add up.

About Abu Lahb, could you please tell me which hadith says about the lightening of his punishment?
The reason I'm asking about the hadith is not at all to change my stance on this according to the authenticity of the hadith. I'm merely wondering how a single hadith can prove to be a basis for an entire event, for times to come. A one-time reaction by a non-believer ==> translated to a lifetime of celebrations taken as part of Islam/belief???

So are you saying that if something good is done once, it’s good and will be rewarded (like abu lahab’s rejoicing). But if it’s done every year, then it’s sinful? (like muslims rejoicing)?

No I'm not generalizing. You're generalizing. I'm talking specifically about Abu Lahb's reaction being translated to an ever-after celebration for Muslims. See, if the Prophet (saw) reacted positively to something or did some act, that can be translated as Sunnah for Muslims - something that they will be rewarded for.. e.g: sleeping on the right side, or being v.kind towards kids, etc.

BUT...

If you take Abu Lahb's act and translate THAT to be part of your deen, that's something I at least, have problems with.

If there is any other justification for celebration of the Prophet(saw)'s birthday, do let me know.

About your last hadith, that still doesn't prove anything about birthdays. I said before too that Prophet's acts are to be followed. So if he fasted on 10th Muharram and asked the Muslims to fast on 9th and 10th, of course it becomes part of deen to do so.

Jazakallah for your input. Allah Knows Best.

PS: If you fast on Mondays and Thursdays every week, that would be following Sunnah. Completely makes sense.

But you're not talking about that, you're just using this hadith to give a justification for birthdays, not fasting on all Mondays and Thursdays. Every Monday is not the Prophet (saw)'s birthday. Every Monday is not 12th Rabbiul awwal.

Mohammad Zafar said...

Assalamu alaikum,

Ok...Read all you people's comments..

** Every minute part of everyone in the world is measure in-terms of Deen, whether you want it or not, no one can say that, this part of my life is not deen(if do good rewards, do bad then gunah..there is no middle thing here)...since everything is measured ***

Now what you say about celebrating your own birthday's...
Aren't we celebrating, our's or our friend's etc...to please ourselves or someone else.

Now since here the loved one is "Our beloved Prophet(s.a.w.s)"...you might connect it to deen(good part)..and etc...

There are people who celebrate birthdays lavishly...what if all muslim's celebrate it? After all, our prophet is Sardar of Ambiya, he should get the treat as per his status....What say?

???????

XV said...

@Uni Asalamualaykum wa rahmatullah,
My answers are in bold


Sorry for late comment replies. I am kind of swamped these days.
First of all, the hadith on fasting on Mondays...
So the hadith you quoted, that hadith is a Muslim hadith (could you find an exact source for it please?) - it's pointing towards Monday for multiple reasons, not just one. And the hadith I quoted, adds another reason.
So using these ahadith to give importance to birthday of the Holy Prophet (saw) and thinking that celebrating it as a special day is something deen-y, is not plausible.


Alhamdulillah, no problem on the delayed response.
In our organizational behavior class, a teacher taught a concept that I think is pertinent at the moment: during the course of a discussion which turns into an argument/debate after a while, the opposing sides tend to move to the extremes of their viewpoints.
Forgive me if I’m mistaken, but are you saying/implying any of this?
that the birth of the prophet (saw) was not an important occasion? Or that prophet’s (saw) fasting specifically on Mondays because he was born on a Monday does not show that he commemorated the day of his birth?
The hadith I quoted is in sahih muslim, book of fasting. Book 6, number 2606.


About you not understanding how deeds done purely for sawaab can be wrong, when even sleeping can be rewarded. So the answer is, that sleeping, eating, or any other act such as fasting, keeping a beard, etc.. all these acts are proven from Sunnah.
Celebrating 12th Rabbiul Awwal as a special day isn't.
So doing something that isn't proven from sunnah as part of deen doesn't add up.

It seems that there is a conflation of two related but nonetheless distinct issues. Fasting, salah, etc are pure ibadaats. Whereas sleeping, eating etc are not. 12th rabbiul awwal is not being put in the category of praying 5 times a day. I’m curious, would you say that driving a car or doing anything out of the ordinary on 14 august is part of deen? Or permissible? Or prohibited?
And like I mentioned previously, there are things that were not explicitly done by the prophet (saw) but are now accepted as permissible and gave the example of taraweeh. Putting diacritical marks in the quran would be another example. Why is it that praying taraweeh is not prohibited according to your logic that states that only those things explicitly done or approved by the prophet (saw) are permissible. When did the prophet (saw) approve of praying tarawareeh every night in jamah in ramadan every year?
Cont...

XV said...

Uni said: About Abu Lahb, could you please tell me which hadith says about the lightening of his punishment?
The reason I'm asking about the hadith is not at all to change my stance on this according to the authenticity of the hadith. I'm merely wondering how a single hadith can prove to be a basis for an entire event, for times to come. A one-time reaction by a non-believer ==> translated to a lifetime of celebrations taken as part of Islam/belief???

It’s in bukhari, chapter of nikah. Vol 7, book 62, number 38
Muslims don’t celebrate because a non-believer celebrated. They celebrate b/c it’s a good thing as shown by the lightening of punishment of even the said non-believer for celebrating and as shown by the prophet (saw) continuously fasting on the day he was born (Monday). And lest we forget, Abu Lahab isn’t the only one that rejoiced at the noble birth (saw).
And please do not put words in my mouth. I try to be very careful and precise in choosing my statements. Where is it that I have said that celebrating the prophet’s birthday every year on a specific date is part of belief? You are refuting statements I have not made or implied.
From the onset, my discussion has been geared towards showing that there is some leeway and argument can be made that celebrating the birth of the prophet is permissible, the key word being permissible. Not mandatory, not part of belief, not part of deen but merely permissible.
My answers to the rest of your post are contingent upon how you answer the taraweeh, cars/14 august, and fasting on Monday questions because those seem to be the crux of the matter at this point and as such, I’ll await your response.

Uni said...

@Mohammad Zafar
When did I say celebrating birthdays is okay in Islam? I am ambivalent on the issue, because I have as yet not decided whether it's to be completely abandoned, or we can adopt a watered down version of it (getting your friends gifts and cake and all).

The point is, one's own birthday is not taken as part of deen.

The Prophet(saw) if needed birthday celebrations from his ummah, I have no doubt he would have said something about it. He (on the other hand) emphasized on holding on to Allah, Quran and sunnah. And nowhere in Sunnah do we find anybody actually venerating and celebrating a day as the Prophet (saw)'s birthday.

Allah's Messenger (saw) wants us to follow him - not invent things and name it as 'Eid' - when he's made it clear that there are only two celebrations in a Muslim's life, which are part of his deen.

jazakallah for your input.

Mohammad Zafar said...

Assalamu A'laikum,

You neither said ok nor Haraam for celebrating birthday's. But actions speak LOUDER than what you say (not meant to hurt you).

The point what I wanted to make is: even muslims like us also have "double standards".

As I already told: Each and every action of EVERY ONE in the world is measured in-terms of DEEN. Whether you think / feel it or not. If we don't think and don't feel its solely our problem, for which we don't have any answer to tell it to Allah Subhanhu wa ta'aala.

Are we not Imitating Kuffar by celebrating "So called BIRTH DAYS".

If you do some research on Birthdays of people like "Ambiya" and "Sahaba" you will find "Iqtilaf" in dates, which shows how much importance they had for Birthday's.

We start fighting at helm of the Issue of Rabiul Awwal, when It should have been told in a generic sense.

May Allah guide us in the Right Path. Ameen

Uni said...

@Mohammad Zafar
I just said that I haven't completed my research for deciding about the haraam factor. And so far, I have come across (the strongest) point of view which says that one can celebrate birthdays, but not at a very grand level [so that it amounts to israaf].

Please make one thing clear. Ikhtilaaf in dates amounts to importance of birthdays ??

Of ambiyan and sahaba??

Where is the evidence of that? Please enlighten me, because this is the first statement of its kind that I am hearing.

-------
When you talk about the Prophet(saw)'s birthday, it becomes a different thing (than our birthdays) because our birthdays are not taken as part of deen, or as source of sawaab.

Eid e Milad un Nabi is celebrated as part of deen. That's arguable. That's all what I'm trying to say.

Jazakallah for your input.

Mohammad Zafar said...

What I am trying to say is: In our life whatever we do, It's either reward-able(sawab) deed or a punishable deed, there are other things which will be decided by Allah whether to punish or forgive (at-least they are not reward-able). I don't think its very hard to decide that Birthday's of one's is nothing to do with rewards.

Regarding Iqtilaf in Dates, the best example is of Prophet Muhammad(s.a.w.s) himself. Please do some research on this..as It may take sometime for me to comeback with Sound Proofs.

Uni said...

@Mohammad Zafar
I am not asking for evidence regarding ikhtilaf in dates. That's well documented. I am asking, how is that proof of importance of birthday celebration?

That's something which doesn't make logical sense.

Also, there can be deeds on which Islam is silent. And those are deeds about which Allah (SWT) Knows best.

So the reward of deeds is not really binary - as you have depicted.

Jazakallah for your input.

Mohammad Zafar said...

Yes, there are things for which Islam is silent. for them I did say that "there are other things which will be decided by Allah whether to punish or forgive (at-least they are not reward-able)." in my previous comment.

Regarding logical-ness of Importance, celebration itself is a way to remember the importance of the Day / Act etc, otherwise why would you celebrate it again, on the same day / date of the next or the other year.

We have lot of examples from the time of Prophet(s.a.w.s) that people used to celebrate many things on many occasions some were part of Jahiliyyah and some were accepted in Islam with different version like "Youm-e-Aashoora". Remember that there was no calendar or hijri system at that time, yet people remembered the day, which has now the "Date" Associated to it.

Birthday's were specially started by the Christians that too in recent times which has caught hold of every community.

There is one more question that arises for a "MUSLIM who's practicing at-least" that Who's sunnah is he following?

Do you have any example from any "Ambiya" or "Sahaba" or any "Salafussaliheen" or any Righteous Ulama, that they celebrated their birthdays?

Uni said...

@Mohammad Zafar
Celebration is a way to give importance to what?

The day? Or Sunnah?

If you mean Sunnah, then there have been ways (specified by the Prophet SAW) to give it importance - namely, to know it, follow it, and spread it.

But if you mean give importance to the Day itself (as in, the birthday), then I fail to find any evidence by Hadith, that asks us to give importance to this birthday.

The people fasted on 10th Muharram. Sure. That was recommended by the Holy Prophet (saw). I ask you again, where do you find any recommendation to fast on 12th Rabbiul awwal every year (or any other conflicting birthday - 9th or whatever), in Hadith?

And yes, your last question is very valid. They didn't celebrate their birthdays.

Jazakallah for your input.

Mohammad Zafar said...

Assalamu A'laikum Warhamatullah,

Sorry for replying late..was just quite busy these days..I hope you are still confused about how I had put forward my points...first in support of celebrating prophet(s.a.w.s)'s birthday and then....all that about our birthday celebrations...

In the first instance I was trying to get to this point...not proving Prophet(s.a.w.s) birthday correct.
Basically both of them cannot be proved as celebratory stuff's in ISLAM. According to Quran and Sunnah its the death and the last hour that has to be remembered and not the birth. So you get lot of Ahadees regarding this proving its importance to remember it.

By celebrating either you Remember it Joyfully to prove your love etc or Venerate it for the sake of worldly ambitions or just for the sake of a traditional practice without knowing what exactly we have to do and what to do to get to closer to Allah and His messenger(s.a.w.s).

Khair...crux of the points is: no birthday celebration is GOOD, whether its of a prophet or a simple human being...its an imitation of the kuffar(As PURELY we are not imitating our pious predecessors here).

Agar hum model Islami zindagi sahaba aur righteous ulama ki samazte hain
to haan ye saraa sar "Double standard" hai ki hum apne aap ko ye samzayen ke "Manaa to nahi kiya gaya", phir to har maamla usee line pe chalega, jo ke hamaare nafs ke pasandeeda model pe hoga.

May Allah give us Fahm of Deen. Ameen

Uni said...

Khair...crux of the points is: no birthday celebration is GOOD, whether its of a prophet or a simple human being...its an imitation of the kuffar(As PURELY we are not imitating our pious predecessors here).

If that was your point, then I completely agree with you.

Jazakallah for your input.